The US is running out of Chinese exports to tax

The US is running out of Chinese exports to tax

HONG KONG (CNNMoney) – The United States could soon run out of Chinese goods to tax if a trade war continues to escalate.

On Tuesday, it released a 195-page list of Chinese exports worth $200 billion facing a 10% tariff. The move came after China retaliated Friday against US tariffs on $34 billion worth of goods by taxing American exports to the same value.

US tariffs on a further $16 billion of Chinese exports are coming soon, taking the total under threat to $250 billion. President Donald Trump has threatened to go much further — possibly targeting as much as $550 billion.

But that number exceeds the total value of Chinese goods imported by the United States last year ($506 billion) and there are signs that US officials are already beginning to struggle to compile new lists of targets.

Tuesday’s list includes live trout, which hasn’t been imported from China for decades, as Bloomberg first noted, as well as obscure items such as badger hair.

It also includes more recognizable exports, such as soy sauce and rice. They’re among thousands of things that could soon get more expensive to import from China.

Here are more of the Chinese goods in the firing line this time.

— Apples— Bananas— Coconuts— Pineapples — Oranges— Pears— Peaches

— Oats— Corn (Maize)— Rice (semi-milled or wholly milled)— Brown and Basmati rice— Corn and potato starch— Peanuts, almonds, walnuts, and chestnuts— Pistachios— Soybeans

— Trout, salmon, yellowfin tuna, cod and seabass (excluding fillets or other meat portions)— Anchovies— Lobsters, crabs and squid— Shark fins— Shrimp and prawns— Caviar— Frozen salmon fillets— Dried fish

— Frozen pork— Frog legs— Pork, other than hams, shoulders, bellies (streaky) and cuts thereof, salted, in brine, dried or smoked

— Onions and garlic— Cauliflower and broccoli— Carrots and turnips— Truffles— Sweetcorn— Frozen potatoes, mushrooms and tomatoes

— Soy sauce— Sugars and sugar syrups— Bread, pastry, cakes and biscuits— Jams

— Rice wine or sake— Sparkling wine (only made from grapes)— Fruit and vegetable juices that contain vitamins or minerals

— Toilet paper— Air conditioning machines— Refrigerators— Freezers— Lawn mower parts— Dryers— Sewing machines— Vacuum cleaners— Bamboo and rattan furniture

— Leather apparel and accessories— Leather belts— Baseball and ski gloves— Plastic raincoats— Luggage — Handbags— Musical instrument cases

— Natural graphite— Quartz, chalk, marble and granite— Silver and metal ores— Hard coal (anthracite)— Liquefied natural gas and propane— Packing boxes and cases made of wood — Raw silk— Some types of wool— Some types of cotton— Some types of denim— Handmade paper— Porcelain or china ceramic wares — Some types of glass, stainless steel, iron, lead, zinc and titanium

— Lead-acid storage batteries for electrically powered vehicles — Lighting equipment used on bicycles— Chassis fitted with engines for some motor vehicles — Parts of farm wagons and carts— Trailers and semi-trailers

— Tobacco cigarettes— Epsom salts— Dog and cat food— Birds’ eggs — Seaweed — Human hair— Badger hair— Guts and bladders of animals— Feathers used for stuffing and down— Axes and machetes— Bovine semen